Mauritius set to become southern hemisphere’s number 1 financial centre within 10 years

Mauritius is set to become the leading financial centre in the southern hemisphere within the next decade.

Before receiving our investment banking licence from the Financial Services Commission of Mauritius, deVere Group spent months undertaking detailed research into the world’s leading and most established international financial centres, ahead of the launch of our firm’s investment banking division.
Following comprehensive studies by our in-house teams and external experts, it was unanimously decided that Mauritius would be the perfect jurisdiction.

As I was quoted by leading financial media outlets Money Marketing and Global Financial Market Review, amongst other publications, as well as other key factors, Mauritius has a robust global reputation, based on the fact that the government is clearly pro-business – crucial in appealing to foreign investment – which is echoed in its policies and procedures.

In addition, Mauritius is renowned for its legally robust structure and its educated English and French-speaking population. It also has a globally convenient time zone, strong communications system and first-class infrastructure and accessibility, which is significant for firms that operate globally.

Furthermore, Mauritius is exceptionally financially competitive in comparison to other international financial centres.

Naturally, if the research we carried out reports these findings about Mauritius, it can be reasonably argued that our global financial brands will reach the same conclusions. Particularly during a time when organisations like ours are focusing beyond the more established centres of international finance, predominantly due to escalating operational costs and rising bureaucracy.

Taking all this into account, I am confident that Mauritius will become the southern hemisphere’s leading international financial centre within the next 10 years.

The powerhouse international financial centres in the northern hemisphere, such as London, New York, Hong Kong and Tokyo will uphold their dominant position in the world for decades.

However, international financial centres in the southern hemisphere, including Sydney, Sao Paolo and Johannesburg, will need to step up to compete with Mauritius as global financial hubs, and to attract global financial services firms.

Indeed, with its financially competitive environment, infrastructure and the government’s pro-business outlook, Mauritius is already ahead of the game as a world-class business destination.

Click here for my LinkedIn profile and Twitter account.

Your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *